Webiz recruits hundreds of programmers in Georgia to adress Israel Hi-Tech workforce deficit

As concerns among Israeli technology companies grow about the chronic shortage of programmers, and about issues of recruitment and training, Webiz has begun adding hundreds of programmers in Georgia. The new programmers join the nearly 200 programmers in Georgia already working for more than 20 Israeli companies such as Kaltura and 888.

The shortfall in programmers and trained tech workers constitutes a very real threat to the future of Israel’s thriving high-tech industry in the long term and presents daily operational problems for large companies and startups alike. Webiz was established three years ago by three Israeli entrepreneurs, to offer at least a partial solution to the problem. The company was founded in the Georgian capital of Tbilisi to train local technological manpower to work with Israeli innovation companies. In addition, it is expected to significantly advance economic cooperation between Israel and Georgia, serving as a bridge between Israeli entrepreneurs and technology initiatives in Georgia searching for cooperation with Israel’s renowned high-tech industry.

Webiz developed a practical training program for high-tech related professions based on the Israeli syllabus. In cooperation with the Business and Technology (BTU) University in Tbilisi. technology students are chosen to participate in a 6-month long course providing programming training in a wide range of computer languages including Node js, DevOps React, QA, UI/UX, and more

The training course is given free of charge and Webiz offers profit sharing for its workers as an additional element of job security, to strengthen worker satisfaction and retention.

Operating from its five-story headquarters in Tbilisi, Webiz has recruited to date 180 programmers, all of whom have been hired by Israeli companies – nearly three quarters at mid to senior level positions. In addition, dozens of additional programmers are currently being recruited by Webiz in Georgia in order to meet the growing demand for development positions at Israeli high-tech companies. The company plans to recruit an additional 200 programmers in 2022 with the aim of significant expansion with a further 1,000 over the next few years. Webiz is currently among the two leading firms in Georgia in the field of recruiting and training high-tech workers.

In addition to its recruitment and training services, with its broad business model based on the rich entrepreneurial experience of the company’s founders, Webiz serves its customer and partners’ wider development needs, including seed investments, product development, project management, marketing, and business development.

Webiz Georgia was established by Eyal Bar Oz, Meni Benish and David Zerah, three serial entrepreneurs and angel investors who, for the past two decades, have been involved in an array of development and investment positions.

Eyal Bar Oz, co-founder and CEO of Webiz, noted: “We are proud to see exemplary levels of professionalism among our trainees and graduates in Georgia. There is a real sense of high morale, a strong work ethic and great loyalty among the ever-expanding team. Company recruits in Georgia are now working for more than 20 Israeli companies, including Kaltura and 888, as well as with Israeli startups that are looking for quality manpower at an attractive price that enables them to survive and continue to grow and operate. Demand has increased to many times above the current supply.”

He added, “Within a few years we will be able to offer a solution that will deal with a substantial portion of the shortage of programmers in Israel through training manpower in Georgia – which has until now proven to be a great untapped potential. We are also taking steps for even more an intensive training to help meet the critical demand of Israeli companies for senior professionals capable of leading complex development processes.”

Israel’s ambassador to Georgia, Ran Gidor, noted: “Israel is well known as one of the main partners of Georgia in the fields of tourism, real estate and agriculture. But in recent years, the focus has gradually been moving towards high-tech and software development. There is great potential here as a new generation of young, well-educated Georgians is emerging, yearning for knowledge, with a western orientation. They are the very best advocates of technology, who first and foremost view Israel as a high-tech power and a leader in innovation and entrepreneurship.”

He concluded: “The Foreign Ministry and the Israeli Embassy in Tbilisi have invested in the past few years, great effort in focused training, professional seminars, and formulating frameworks for high-tech cooperation with Georgian government institutions. Therefore, we welcome the groundbreaking work being conducted by Webiz and view it as a future anchor for deepening the wide range of bilateral relations between the two countries.”